The Beatles...White Album

Discussion in 'Everything Else' started by christine1966, Apr 23, 2013.

  1. christine1966 Well-Known Member

    white-album_gatefold_1000x500.jpg

    For Maudes...

    This is taken from Wikipedia, lol.

    The Beatles is the ninth official album by English rock group the Beatles, a double album released in 1968. It is also commonly known as "The White Album", as it has no graphics or text other than the band's name embossed (and, on the early LP and CD releases, a serial number) on its plain white sleeve.
    Upon its release in November 1968, the album received mixed reviews from music critics, who criticized its satirical songs as unimportant and apolitical amid a turbulent political and social climate. However, it reached number 1 on the charts in both the United Kingdom and the United States. The album has sold over 30 million copies worldwide and has since been viewed by critics as one of the greatest albums of all time.
    The Beatles was recorded between 30 May 1968 and 14 October 1968, largely at Abbey Road Studios, with some sessions at Trident Studios.
    Cult leader Charles Manson persuaded members of his "family" that the album was an apocalyptic message predicting a prolonged race war and justified the murder of wealthy people.




    All songs written and composed by Lennon–McCartney, except where noted.
    Side one
    No.
    Title
    Lead vocals[52]
    Length
    1.
    McCartney
    2:43
    2.
    Lennon
    3:56
    3.
    Lennon
    2:17
    4.
    McCartney
    3:08
    5.
    McCartney
    0:52
    6.
    Lennon
    3:14
    7.
    Harrison
    4:45
    8.
    Lennon
    2:43
    Side two
    No.
    Title
    Lead vocals
    Length
    1.
    McCartney
    2:28
    2.
    Lennon
    2:03
    3.
    McCartney
    2:18
    4.
    "Piggies" (Harrison)
    Harrison
    2:04
    5.
    McCartney
    3:33
    6.
    Starr
    3:51
    7.
    McCartney
    1:41
    8.
    McCartney
    1:46
    9.
    Lennon
    2:54
    Side three
    No.
    Title
    Lead vocals
    Length
    1.
    McCartney and Lennon
    2:42
    2.
    Lennon
    4:01
    3.
    McCartney
    2:48
    4.
    Lennon
    2:24
    5.
    Lennon
    3:15
    6.
    McCartney
    4:29
    7.
    "Long, Long, Long" (Harrison)
    Harrison
    3:04
    Side four
    No.
    Title
    Lead vocals
    Length
    1.
    Lennon
    4:15
    2.
    McCartney
    2:41
    3.
    "Savoy Truffle" (Harrison)
    Harrison
    2:54
    4.
    Lennon, with McCartney
    3:02

    Speaking from Lennon, Harrison, George Martin and Yoko Ono



    8:22

    tyred likes this.
  2. Aww Christine, thanks. Some great, great songs there. :thumbsup:
    fox67 likes this.
  3. christine1966 Well-Known Member

    SG1 likes this.
  4. christine1966 Well-Known Member

  5. christine1966 Well-Known Member

    Sides 3 and 4 coming...
  6. fox67 Active Member

    Number Nine............Number Nine...........:p
    SG1 and Lillyloo like this.
  7. Berkeley64 Well-Known Member

    The White Album is my favorite Beatles album. It's so eclectic that it has something for just about everyone, from Lennon's deeply touching song about his mother, Julia, to the raucous party rocking of Birthday. Several of the songs were inspired by the Beatles trip to India early in 1968. It really was the first Beatles album where there was essentially no collaboration on songs between Lennon and McCartney, as each tune is truly the individuals artist's own composition.

    I'd be remiss if I didn't mention Eric Clapton's excellent guitar playing on While My Guitar Gently Weeps.

    I remember playing parts of the album backward on the turntable after the "Paul is dead" hoax surfaced in 1969, and hearing "Paul is dead, miss him, miss him, him" in the space between I'm So Tired and Blackbird, and "Turn Me On Dead Man" when the refrain "Number Nine" was played backward. Ah, ... memories of simpler times.

    If I recall correctly, the album was released on the Monday before Thanksgiving in 1968.

    By the way, I think that you forget to list Good Night as the last song on side 4.
    SG1 likes this.
  8. SG1 Moderator

    Harrison returned the favor by helping to write and perform the song "Badge" for Eric Clapton's group Cream around that same time. I had the vinyl album with booklet and large color glossies. One can listen to Revolution 9 (and probably other songs from the album) backwards on Youtube.
  9. SG1 Moderator

    Thank you Christine1966 for this.
  10. SG1 Moderator

    A redhead who worked under me needed some cash so I said "help me paint my house." So were drinking beer and painting and I'm playin' music. I play the Wgite Album one time. At some point "number nine...number nine....". She was probably wtf? So when we carpooled we would go through the drive-through at McDonald's and order two breakfast burritos, which at that time anyway was number 9 on the menu. So would order "yeah could I get a number nine...number nine...number nine...". Lol

    White Album
  11. dvs1572 Active Member

  12. dvs1572 Active Member

    a couple of Manson/Beatles Videos I compiled together. With all this in the video, I highly doubt the Helter Skelter motive, a very small part of me says.....maybe.
  13. dvs1572 Active Member

  14. dvs1572 Active Member

  15. Bill Well-Known Member

    I think I saw a photo of Sharon with Ringo Star some where. Has anyone here seen it?
  16. SG1 Moderator

    cannes.with.ringo.jpg Well, sort of...
    Bill likes this.
  17. Bill Well-Known Member

  18. Berkeley64 Well-Known Member

    The White Album is 45 years old today, as it was first released in the U.S. on Monday, November 25, 1968, the Monday before Thanksgiving, as I remember.

    It still holds up quite well to the test of time, sounding as fresh today as it did on that Fall Monday 45 years ago, from "Back in the U.S.S.R." all the way through "Good Night."

    The four lads from Liverpool had certainly come a long way from the days of Please Please Me five years earlier.
    SG1 likes this.
  19. SG1 Moderator

    All true, except "holds up quite well to the test of time". This music doesn't need to hold up to anything. If you're talking about people still liking it, they should like beautiful creation, regardless of when it was created. If anything ever sounds "dated" to anyone then they are under some illusion that music that came later is somehow more fresh and innovating. So the better stuff from the past "holds up".

    Wrong. If anything, the more recent stuff (1978 and on) should be judged if it holds up to the era of the greatest flourish of creativity in popular music. Nothing today can hold a candle to this album.

    Forgive the rant. Relishing the album with you.
    mother62 likes this.

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